10 Great Islands You've Never Heard Of!

You escape to an island for that splendid sense of isolation. The problem is, lots of other travelers have the exact same idea. These days, getting away from it all requires some creativity

To get to Holbox from the port of Chiquila, catch the 9 Hermanos Ferry for the half-hour ride (travelyucatan.com, $4). Depending on the season, $80 to $130 scores a thatched-roof palapa, with beds made of rough-hewn logs, and a breakfast of eggs and fresh fruit, at the Xaloc Resort (011-52/984-87-52160, holbox-xalocresort.com). --Melinda Page

Fiji, Ovalau

From 1852 to 1882, Levuka, a rowdy outpost for sailors and traders on the island of Ovalau, served as Fiji's capital. Today, the Fijian government and most tourists do their business on Viti Levu, leaving Ovalau quiet and empty. The clapboard storefronts along Levuka's main drag have survived largely intact from the colonial days. Instead of the rollicking saloons of yesteryear, they now house quiet dry-goods stores and a few restaurants, such as Whale's Tale (011-679/344-0235, fresh fish or pasta entrées $6). Another relic is the Royal Hotel, which opened in 1852 and is Fiji's oldest hotel (011-679/344-0024, royal@connect.com.fj, doubles from $18). The old South Pacific comes to life in the lounge, which has creaking rattan furniture, a snooker table, and giant tortoise shells hanging on the walls. Rooms are furnished simply, with a couple of cots, toilet, and shower. The four guest rooms at Levuka Homestay offer better accommodations, including air-conditioning, a shady deck, and a full breakfast (011-679/344-0777, levukahomestay.com, doubles from $65). Round trips from Suva, on Viti Levu, to Levuka start at $72 (Air Fiji, 011-679/331-3666, airfiji.net).

Ovalau lacks good swimming beaches, but the soft corals surrounding the island make for fine diving. Ovalau Watersports runs daily dives, as well as tours to Caqalai, a speck of an island with coral sand beaches 40 minutes away (011-679/344-0166, owlfiji.com, two-tank dive $75, Caqalai tour $40). --M.B.

Croatia, Korcula

A jewel box that juts like a thumb from the main body of the island, Korcula's Old Town owes much of its architectural heritage to the 15th and 16th centuries, when it was part of the prosperous Republic of Venice. Narrow streets lined with medieval white-stone buildings spread out from the spire of St. Mark's Cathedral at the center of town. Encircling the densely packed city is a 14th-century wall; sapphire-blue waters surround the entire isle.

Korcula is connected by ferry to the more popular towns of Split and Dubrovnik (Jadrolinija Ferries, jadrolinija.hr, from $5). The boat drops you off in Vela Luka, on Korcula's western end. Buses bump along the spine of the island eastbound to Korcula Town, dipping past black cypress trees and terraced olive groves, with some hairpin turns along the way. On the harbor in Old Town is the Hotel Korcula, a Venetian palace with a loggia where you can have breakfast and look across the bay to the hills of the mainland (011-385/20-711-078, doubles from $67). A 10-minute bus ride away, the small fishing village of Lumbarda has the only sandy beaches on the island--at the end of a red dirt path that winds through vineyards that produce a crisp white wine called Grk. Enjoy a glass and dig into fresh grilled fish and octopus back in Korcula Town at Konoba Adio Mare (011-385/20-711-253, dinner for two $35). After dinner, go for a stroll through romantically lit Old Town. Pass by the city walls on the way to the harbor to watch the sky glow and slowly darken over the channel and the hillsides. --Sunshine Flint

Brazil, Ilha Grande

Rio's beaches sizzle, but when Brazilians want the escape that only an island can offer, they go to Ilha Grande. The 119-square-mile slice of paradise is home to 106 beaches, 500 full-time residents, and no cars (they're banned). Bring good walking shoes or be prepared to paddle a kayak, which are the only ways to find some of the best beaches and coves. Surfers are wowed by the waves at Lopes Mendes and other beaches, divers love the caverns and crystal clear waters in every direction, and hikers keep busy with scores of trails, such as the one that ascends 3,200 feet to the island's best lookout, Pico do Papagaio (Parrot's Peak).

Until a decade ago, the only visitors to the island came in shackles. Ilha Grande served as a penal colony until 1994, so tourism is relatively new; there's little chance of finding resort chains renting wave runners. Abraão, the main hub, consists of a few souvenir shops and cafés. Ilhagrande.com.br lists places to stay and covers the basics, including how to get to Angra dos Reis or Mangaratiba, the mainland ports that connect to Ilha Grande by two-hour ferry. The island's edges are dotted with inns, or pousadas--most quite inexpensive thanks to the strong U.S. dollar. The nine suites at Sagu Resort are decorated simply, with exposed wooden beams and white walls, and outside each guest room there's a porch with a hammock (011-55/24-3361-5660, saguresort.com, doubles from $80). The property overlooks the beach, and up a stone path you can kick back in the dreamy ofuro (hot tub). Abraão is a 15-minute walk away, but most everything you want is right at the resort, including kayak rentals, caipirinhas, fresh-caught fish, and tropical fruit picked from the garden. --Jessica Shaw

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Note:This story was accurate when it was published. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.
 

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